Pacific Northwest
Pollution Prevention Roundtable

March 17 - 18, 2004
Mountaineers Building, Seattle, Washington
Regional Roundtable Minutes

Where available, each speaker's presentation is available in Power Point format.

Table of Contents
Updates (from Day 1)
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP)
Lean Manufacturing
Lunch Quiz
P2 Resource Exchange (P2Rx) Update
Big Picture: Sustainability Work throughout the Northwest
Updates (from Day 2)
Product Stewardship
Sustainability Work in Government Programs and Facilities
Blue Sky Session: Future Roundtable Plans
Funders/Fundees Reality-Check
Attendees and Speakers List

Day 1 Updates

  • Sector Outreach Work
  • Waste- or Issue-Specific Work
  • Awards/Recognition Programs
  • New Tools and Resources
  • All roundtable attendees will share news about recent or upcoming projects, events, or reports from their organizations.

    Sector Outreach

    Chris Wiley (PPRC) Working on three upcoming sector projects: 1) biotechnology sector roundtable, 2) semiconductor manufacturing sector roundtable, 3) organizing an Oregon nursery operations roundtable

    Burt Hamner (Independent consultant, currently working with Pacific NW Economic Region, an organization representing legislators of 4 NW states) Working on sustainable investment with financial sector, developing an index that will illustrate that sustainable companies do better financially; will be holding a Sustainability and Banking workshop in Oregon; doing outreach to banks and investment and pension funds

    Alice Chapman (King County Local Hazardous Waste Management Program) Chronic Dental Project-discussed King County's attempt to remove mercury-containing amalgam from dental wastewater, through voluntary approach and most recently through mandatory approaches. Auto body shops: the county recently finished a report on painting filters and designation, looking at heavy metals and persistent halogenated compounds. Currently working on another study on pharmaceutical drugs and best management practices. This information is available online.

    Waste Reduction

    Josh Chaitin (King County Local Hazardous Waste Management Program) His program worked parallel with Washington State identifying mercury as toxic of concern, LHWMP works with households and small businesses, specifically with dentists and HVAC businesses lately; thermometer exchange program, fluorescent lamps, currently forming coalition with auto recycler associations, International Steel Institute, NUCOR-to switch out mercury switches in cars, follow state of Maine requiring auto manufacturers to pay for end-of-life

    Patti Best (Idaho Department of Environmental Quality) Looking at public drinking water systems, specifically focusing on the presence of mercury in pumps

    Kristin Bonner (Metafore) Metafore is an organization that catalyzes business action to restore and preserve forests around the world. Specifically working on Paper Working Group, an effort that includes 10 corporations that embrace social, environmental and economic responsibility in their business practices and transactions such as TimeWarner, Starbucks, Staples, Toyota, McDonalds, etc; collectively, goal is to increase consistent and affordable supply of environmentally preferable paper. The companies represent 1% of market; 7 desired outcomes including cleaner production, efficient resource use, community and human wellbeing, broad; focused on outcomes, not attributes.

    Marney Jett (Clean Water Services) Discussed dental program that City of Portland started working in 1995 with dentists, specifically on silver; key to success of voluntary compliance was partnership with Oregon Dental Association (ODA); asked dentists to follow best management practices for recycling metals; will be taking program statewide; the ODA, in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Association of Clean Water Agencies, will be sponsoring a free, one day collection event for mercury and scrap amalgam wastes.

    Brett Hulstrom (City of Portland, Recycling Program) Mercury switchout program, auto program recently went statewide through DEQ regional offices, just certified 10-15 shops throughout state; recently created Landscape Eco-Logical business program, recognizes landscape design maintenance, irrigation companies that meet certain standards

    Eun-Sook Goidel (PPRC also working with the Federal Network for Sustainability) FNS is an organization of federal agencies that convened in April 2000 to commit to sustainablility. Working on copier paper, FNS chose to define green aspects of paper-specifically chlorine-free bleaching, use of post-consumer content, no old growth content. Paper Campaign looked at 3 aspects: 1) reduce overall use of copier papers by federal agencies 2) switch to greener copier paper 3) ensure fully-functioning recycling system. Have seen significant improvement from FNS members. For more information, see www.federalsustainability.org

    Archie Beaton (Chlorine Free Products) New program called SMMI, index of sustainability, that entails pulp and paper plants auditing themselves

    Burt Hamner Sustainability indicators and management practices in mining sector of Peru

    Chris Wiley (PPRC) 1) NW fluorescent lamp recycling program-already involved in getting mercury out of lamps in the past, now involved in getting businesses to work on recycling, campaign will outreach to all 4 states and work with industrial suppliers to start infrastructure for take-back 2) Federal Electronics Challenge-Viccy to talk about in EPP session-federal agencies to better manage electronic products, as part of national rollout in Fall 2004 will have different levels of achievement and recognition 3) recently completed mercury report for WA State Department of Ecology, researched manufacturers who use mercury in process

    Leatta Dahloff (Washington State Dept of Ecology) Washington state Governor Locke issued executive order on PBTs; Ecology to come up with new guidelines; broadening guidelines of Governor's Award on Sustainability and Pollution Prevention

    Awards and Recognition Program

    Bob Drake (EPA Region 10) The Evergreen Annual Award recognizes outstanding pollution prevention efforts within all sectors of the greater Pacific Northwest business community. May be looking at another round in the next couple of months to prompt increased interest.

    Burt Hamner designing Index of Responsible NW companies (market index). There are currently 39 indexes around the world with socially responsible companies, possibility to do something similar in region; putting together group of people to evaluate measures by which a publicly traded company will be recognized

    New Tools and Resources

    Brian Westra (King County Local Hazardous Waste Management Program) New website on new domain http://www.govlink.org/hazwaste. Site covers different areas of focus: Household, Business, and interagency information, lots of work getting more and more publications online, would appreciate comments to improve site

    Burt Hamner Updated resource: CD-ROM called Greatest Hits of Cleaner Production and P2, he will soon update it, if interested in web design and how to produce CD-ROMs, talk to him

    Chris Wiley (PPRC) 1) Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Tools-will be very useful for TAPs in communication with businesses; 2) Product Prioritization Tool incorporates factors of environmental, political, price, etc to come up with which product to focus on first in EPP planning; market survey protocol, basically a checklist to help guide someone to identify what alternative products are available; looking for state agencies or other client that might like to take this tool and apply it; 3) Performance Specifications database-will identify products that meet manufacturing specifications but are "greener" than their more toxic counterparts.

    Neil Collie (Sustainable Products Purchasers Coalition) Goal is to provide a standardized form in which manufacturers can provide life cycle data for their products compatible with the variety of accepted LCA tools currently in use in the industry; working with lifecycle assessment scientists to create single-page document, MSDS form and format, C&A Floor Coverings EcoProfile available on website

    Carolyn Gangmark (EPA Region 10) Follow-up letter to recently-inspected businesses suggesting P2

    Ken Grimm (PPRC) mentioned WA State Dept. of Ecology's big package of tools and resources for TAPs; cross-training available with Ecology and EPA to get P2 message into compliance visits

    Discussion followed on Washington State Governor's Award for P2 and Sustainability, possible partnerships with economic development efforts and mixed messaging with private and public efforts for green paper procurement.


    Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP)

  • Eun-Sook Goidel, PPRC (facilitator)
  • Jonell Allamano, U.S. EPA Region 10
  • Ron Dalberg, Swedish Medical Center
  • Eric Nelson, King County
  • Servando Patlan, WA Office of State Procurement
  • Eun-Sook Goidel, PPRC (session organizer)
  • Cathy Buller, PPRC (facilitator)
  • The EPP session was split into two parts. In the morning, a panel of regional EPP pioneers debated and shared their experiences and strategies with each other to address challenges that they face in their EPP programs. The audience was given an opportunity to pose questions at the end of this 90 minute session. In the afternoon, a presentation was made on key "ingredients" for an EPP program.

    Environmentally preferable purchasing (EPP) or "green" procurement is a concept that melds procurement and environmental ethic into an enhanced purchasing strategy. Since the early 1990s, a growing number of public and private sector organizations have begun using green procurement as a tool to minimize the environmental and human health impacts associated with their purchasing decisions.

    Morning Panel Discussion

    Jonell Allamano, U.S. EPA Region 10
    With EPA Region 10's spending estimated to be around $2.5 million per year, Jonell realized the potential impact of this level of buying power. She first introduced EPP strategies at the start of an office space remodel in 1998. By the end of the remodel, the contractor reused and recycled 95% of the construction debris. In addition, Region 10 has been buying greener copier paper in the past 4-5 years. At the same time she was working on procuring green copier paper, she also was able to incorporate EPP principles when shopping around for new copiers.

    Ron Dalberg, Swedish Medical Center
    Swedish Medical Center is leading the industry in pollution prevention and environmental protection. Ron Dalberg is the Corporate Director for Purchasing and Contracts at Swedish and is responsible for over $105 million per year in purchasing. Ron established 6 Value Analysis Teams (VATs), using these teams to review cost and utilization of products by clinical area. This process has helped to gain awareness of new products and opportunities to better understand the factors that are involved in supplies and pharmaceuticals. Each VAT is a cross-functional team chaired by a vice-president. Since implementation of EPP, supply cost as a percentage of net revenue has decreased from 23% to 15.8%, amounting to a significant reduction in costs.

    Eric Nelson, Environmental Purchasing Program, King County Procurement and Contract Services Section
    In the past year, King County purchased $5 million worth of environmentally preferable products, saving $580,000 compared to the cost of the products ordinarily purchased. The initial EPP strategy was a top-down policy change, but it became clear that only a bottom-up strategy would be effective because it recognizes the knowledge and experience of those "working on the street". Eric's department is in charge of packaging EPP information and presenting it to individual county agencies. He has found out that the best outcomes arise when people take ideas and "own them"-implementing them in the best way that they see fit. http://www.metrokc.gov/procure/green

    Servando Patlan, WA Office of State Procurement
    The role of Office of State Procurement (OSP) is to develop goals, specifications, and guidelines for purchasing and EPP. Their power is limited as they can only advise compliance and do not have the authority to enforce. Washington State spending is estimated to be $1 billion per year, with $200 Million in state contracts, and $800 million spent by agencies. OSP developed an EPP purchasing guide through a partnership with Washington State Department of Ecology, which helped them to gain credibility. They have also been able to gain visibility through the Government Accounting Office by requiring departments to report EPP performance data in their yearly budgets. Within OSP, a number of strong management and accountability measures are in place to support environmentally preferable purchasing. For example, Purchasing Unit Managers' performance standards include environmentally preferable purchasing goals and are tied to monetary incentives. http://www.ga.wa.gov/Sustainability/index.html

    Discussion:
    Participants discussed different challenges and barriers they have encountered in the implementation of their individual programs. Some similar challenges were the raising of awareness and sensitivity to organizational culture. Some ways to deal with these problems were to present EPP information in a non-threatening way, have a strong message of intent from the top of the organization while recognizing and taking advantage of expertise at the "street level", set visible goals, and use accountability and recognition approaches. All agreed that to be environmentally sustainable is to have a competitive advantage over competitors.

    Session participants asked about the best way to compel institutions to start looking at total cost accounting. The first step is to know all the elements involved in the cost of service. The more you know about what goes into the cost of service, the better equipped you are to start affecting the price. It is extremely important to understand the difference in organizational culture and how to work within that context in the most effective way, i.e. what works for Swedish may not work for Washington State.

    Session participants also discussed the difficulty in determining what is really "green". Many desire a simplified "silver bullet" for how to buy EPP products, but unfortunately there is no such thing. Some ways to determine "green" are through organization-unique standards, vendor claims about its products or practices, government standards or guides (e.g., Energy Star), third party standards (e.g., Green Seal, CFPA, Canada's Environmental Choice).

    Afternoon EPP presentation

    Building on the morning discussions, the afternoon presentation covered the nitty-gritty of putting EPP concepts into practice. The training included key "ingredients" needed for a successful EPP program as well as specific tools to facilitate implementation of a program. Environmentally Preferable Purchasing: P2 Regional Roundtable (2.1 MB)


    Lean Manufacturing

  • Ken Grimm, PPRC (facilitator)
  • John Vicklund, Washington Manufacturing Services
  • Sarah Earl, Artemis Onsite
  • Jennifer Sprechler, Washington State Quality Award
  • This session covered how service providers can approach manufacturers with P2 concepts, and how lean manufacturing applies to pollution prevention and waste reduction. Lean manufacturing is an excellent opportunity for manufacturers to improve efficiency and competitiveness and allows businesses to produce what customers want, when they want it.

    Lean manufacturing is a holistic methodology that seeks to minimize the resources required for production by eliminating waste and non-value added activities that inflate costs, lead times and inventory requirements. Lean also emphasizes preventive maintenance, quality improvement, inventory pull systems, and flexible work forces and stations.

    John Vicklund, Washington Manufacturing Services (WMS) - "Washington Manfuacturing Services: Solutions for Manufacturing Excellence" (312 KB)
    Smaller manufacturers make up the lifeblood of the U.S. economy. They account for about 98% of all U.S. manufacturers, and employ about 12.2 million people. Today, many find it difficult to keep pace with new standards of productivity and quality. Markets demand higher quality products, at lower prices, and in record time. Lean manufacturing is one tool that can help manufacturers achieve this.

    WMS is a statewide, not-for-profit, resource center with the mission to help Washington manufacturers become and/or stay more competitive. WMS is part of a national network of manufacturing extension centers affiliated with the National Institute for Standards and Technologies, and most have expertise in lean manufacturing and provide affordable assistance to helping manufacturers through implementation and training. Their Lean Manufacturing Certificate Program was recommended by a participant, Judy Kennedy (Washington Department of Ecology). More information on this program is available at http://www.wamfg.org/pages/events.html.

    Sarah Earl, Artemis On-Site
    Sarah discussed particular examples of applications of lean manufacturing to specific businesses, and the resulting benefits from less wasted product and resources. She offered contrasting company profiles for a metal caster that produces mostly individual custom parts and small batches, vs. companies that produce mass quantities of the same parts.

    Jennifer Sprechler, Washington State Quality Award - "The Hunt is Over" (266 KB)
    The Executive Director of the Washington State Quality Awards (WSQA), Jennifer Sprecher, spoke about how WSQA motivates, educates, assists, and congratulates Washington organizations for using the Malcolm Baldrige Quality Criteria to improve their environmental performance. She explained how the principles of lean manufacturing are spreading into service-oriented business such as mail delivery, healthcare, and schools, and how lean manufacturing ties into aspects of the Malcolm Baldridge Criteria and Core Values. Jennifer also gave impressive examples of performance improvement from companies before and after becoming certified to the Malcolm Baldridge Criteria. http://www.wsqa.net, http://www.quality.nist.gov.


    Lunch Quiz

  • Crispin Stutzman, PPRC
  • "Quiz and Answers" (21 KB)


    P2 Resource Exchange (P2Rx) Update

  • Chris Wiley, PPRC
  • "P2Rx" (289 KB)


    Big Picture: Sustainability Work throughout the Northwest

  • Nik Blosser, Sustainable Industries Journal and Celilo Group Media
  • - "Sustainable Industries" (4.6 MB)

    Nik Blosser presented on the current status and future outlook for sustainable industries in the Pacific Northwest. He started the presentation with the story of Celilo Group Media's beginnings and the birth of the Chinook Book. It was from this initial commitment to helping sustainable companies in Portland market their goods and services better that the Sustainable Industries Journal was born. Sustainable industries are defined as businesses that have ecological innovation as a core part of their business model. Currently there are 4 major categories of sustainable industries in the Pacific Northwest: green building, recycled products, sustainable agriculture/natural resources, and renewable/smart energy. He discussed each category at length, talked about its current status and opportunities for growth.

    The question and answer period focused on effective ways to promote sustainable industries, possible partners in this effort, and regional trends in sustainable business.


    Day 2 Updates

  • Innovative Partnerships
  • Benchmarking and Measurement Work
  • Health Care Sector Work
  • New Tools and Resources
  • All roundtable attendees will share news about recent or upcoming projects, events, or reports

    Health Care

    Chris Wiley (PPRC) MIRT-Medical Industry Waste Reduction Roundtable-great group of regulatory agencies, water folks, industry representatives, consultants, NPOs, who have common interest in outreach to health care, facilitating the planning of seminars-management of pharmaceuticals is the latest topic; will be planning 2 more seminars, one on non-processed waste and another meeting will look at everything else that could be recyclable material such as food waste, pesticides, plastics, even lawn trimmings, opportunity for risk reduction and cost savings; specific focus on food waste composting-larger research and health care facilities that have multiple buildings on campuses have an opportunity for food waste composting, in King County and Puget Sound region there may be some program and policy directives and capacity from haulers and processors, working together to see if this type of project is possible; just received funding to replicate MIRT in AK and ID, developing a step-by-step guide that will reflect on experience from Puget Sound MIRT, create guidance of establishing a similar network in any local community, will result in document/report, provide tools on how to bring people together; H2E-partnering with DEQ and OCEH, figuring out how to outreach to hospitals, would like feedback from any hospital representative present

    Josh Chaitin (King County LHWMP) takeback program for pharmaceutical waste, working with regulatory agencies to ensure safe and practical way for proper disposal of pharmaceuticals

    Discussion ensued on pharmaceutical waste concern in wastewater treatment in Oregon and Idaho.

    Partnerships

    Chris Wiley (PPRC) PPRC developed series of fact sheets to industrial launderers as they are in the door of all these businesses that PPRC tries to outreach to, businesses always ask launderers questions about how to manage waste, perfect opportunity to get educational materials out there in a non-threatening and effective way; P2RX network-partnership of national P2 providers

    Carolyn Gangmark (EPA Region 10) During reviews for Evergreen Award applications, she found a pest control company on Eastside (Bellevue, Washington area) that tells customers about extermination around people's foundations. The company has an independent interest in P2, and brings a checklist with all the common wood preservatives, chemicals, rodenticides, common hazardous things people stockpile in basement. The company doesn't directly benefit from this, but has a unique opportunity with access to people's homes. Carolyn suggested that these kinds of innovators are those we should work in partnership with

    Josh Chaitin (King County LHWMP) He mentioned a partnership between local and state government for mercury switch-out program; 2 trade associations-auto recyclers and manufacturers of recycled steel and shredding yards, working with entire supply chain; realized the importance of linking with business/private sector to talk about how these programs benefits them, good product stewardship to put onus on auto manufacturers to manage waste; thermostats recycling program-working with wholesalers and HVAC contractors, tapped into takeback program with Honeywell, where they will pay for recycling of thermostats, Honeywell didn't publicize this program very well, so Gail Savina from King County is trying to increase recycling, developing a partnership with specific pieces of industry, service providers and who they purchase from, to ensure safe management of waste

    Patti Best (Idaho DEQ) Air Quality campaign, partnership with local sourcewater department on dissemination of information

    Clean Water Services statewide dental waste management effort with Oregon Dental Association and various state agencies.

    Measurement and Benchmarking

    Chris Wiley (PPRC)- National P2 Results Taskforce, trying to develop a national system to report outcomes of P2 activities and projects

    Sally Tarowsky (ID Small Business Development Center), on national taskforce at Small Business Assistance Program working on national scale to develop performance measurement tool

    Eva Crim (Kitsap County Health District, Washington State) EnviroStars program in is maintaining database on types of visits and outcomes, results and goals to answer at county level how to better measure environmental health programs.

    Signe Gilson (Port of Seattle)- NBIS conference for end of September, purpose is to generate innovative partnerships between businesses and NPO's, to encourage and provide resources for businesses to move toward sustainability

    Gwen Vernon (Cascadia Consulting Group) Seattle Public Utility has adopted triple bottom line accounting to evaluate programs based on sustainability

    Discussion followed on projects that participants were eager to work on but don't have resources or time yet. Some projects discussed were lack of access in rural areas to hazardous waste disposal systems, lack of P2 in higher education programs and Greening the Supply Chain efforts.


    Product Stewardship

  • Michelle Gaither, PPRC (facilitator)
  • Viccy Salazar, US EPA Region 10
  • David Stitzhal, Full Circle Environmental, Inc.
  • Phil Berry, Nike Corporation
  • Lois Maffeo, Batdorf & Bronson Coffee Roasters
  • Shirli Axelrod, Seattle Public Utilities
  • This presentation laid a foundation for product stewardship by discussing its origins and principles, how it is different from traditional recycling, various implementation strategies, and the latest developments on the domestic and international front.

    Viccy Salazar, Product Stewardship Program Manager, US EPA Region 10, and David Stitzhal, Coordinator, Northwest Product Stewardship Council introduced and defined product stewardship for the group and covered the different aspects of and strategies for implementing product stewardship. "Product Stewardship - A New Paradigm?" (2.8 MB)

    Phil Berry, the Director of Footwear Sustainability at Nike, and Lois Maffeo, in Information & Publications at Batdorf and Bronson Coffee Roasters, spoke about their individual company's attempts to incorporate the principles of product stewardship into their operations.

    The audience was presented with a case study exercise of two contrasting companies, to address the challenges a technical assistance provider might encounter in helping or convincing this type of company put product stewardship into practice.

    In conclusion, Viccy, David, and Shirli Axelrod, Senior Environmental Analyst Seattle Public Utilities Department, discussed current programs and exemplary projects in the US, as well as international efforts. Viccy and Michelle offered a selection of additional handouts, organizations, and other resources.


    Sustainability Work in Government Programs and Facilities

  • Chris Wiley, PPRC (facilitator)
  • Dennis Bohay, Washington State Dept. of Ecology
  • Lynn Helbrecht, Washington Governor’s Executive Policy Office
  • Hugh O'Neill, Washington State Dept. of Ecology
  • What’s been learned to date with Washington’s Executive Order on Sustainability, and where is that work headed next? How is sustainability being incorporated into P2 Plans from hazardous waste generators in Washington? And how is the “beyond waste” concept being considered within the Washington Dept. of Ecology, to address greenhouse gases, PBT’s, organics, green building and moderate risk waste activities?

    Dennis Bowhay
    Dennis presented Ecology's Beyond Waste concept. The idea takes a 30 year approach to reducing waste to zero in Washington state. It focuses on:

  • Making green building the norm
  • Cutting industrial toxics and hazardous waste
  • Recycling organics
  • Eliminating most "moderate risk" waste
  • Developing better tracking systems to measure progress toward zero waste goals

  • Dennis said the plans will emphasis use of partnerships, and the plan is still pretty new, even to staff at Ecology. A big part of making progress with the plan will involve finding ways to facilitate these waste reduction goals, and developing and providing tools and incentives will be useful for Washington businesses.

    Lynn Helbrecht - "The New Path Forward" (1.1 MB)
    Lynn works in the Washington State Governor's office. By executive order, each state agency now submits sustainability plans, as part of its annual budget process. Lynn works to educate agencies about the requirements, and reviews the plans that are submitted. The first cycle of sustainability plans were due in September 2003. These can be accessed online at http://www.ofm.wa.gov/sustainability/index.htm.

    Hugh O'Neill
    Ecology is strategizing and developing the next generation of P2 planning. Ecology would like to encourage the use of EMSs and sustainable elements. Ecology would also like to strongly support Washington businesses and manufacturers. The challenge is to develop methods to institutionalize sustainability concepts into Washington businesses, to keep them productive, competitive, and environmentally sound. These concepts will likely find their way into Ecology's Beyond Waste plan.

    Discussion:
    Session participants discussed the idea of how to tie sustainability to business planning, and participants explored the link between quality management and planning and P2. Quality, as a concept, is more familiar, and acceptable, to businesses. It's also a very logical connection to increased sustainability. A representative from the VA said that they've done this, with very positive results. It was an easy "sell" to administrators, as they already knew the concept, and has led to better service and an enhanced reputation for the VA.

    Social responsibility is also a popular driver right now. It resonates with many businesses, and could be another vehicle to instituting sustainability into business.

    Participants also discussed the idea of adopting the Baldridge concepts, perhaps as a Baldridge P2 Planning requirement. This could capture quality ideas and sustainability concepts into day-to-day business management.

    Businesses that sell overseas, or multinational corporations that operate overseas are starting to adjust to models and demand forces coming from Europe and Japan that incorporate elements of sustainability. One participant noted that 75% of Fortune 500 companies are now using the Baldridge model, or the Balance Scorecard (http://www.balancedscorecard.org), or some other measureable type of quality system. Some of the key drivers are:

  • Globalization
  • Social responsibility
  • Management structures (Total Quality Management, Lean Manufacturing, etc.)

  • Blue Sky Session: Future Roundtable Plans

  • Chris Wiley and Cathy Buller, PPRC
  • Brainstorming suggestions:
    Topics when people are getting together (not necessarily related to Roundtable but just topics people are thinking about):

  • Invite someone from Sustainable production Toxics Use Reduction Institute (TURI)-include a case study of a business who has made the leap successfully
  • Understanding language of business-how to frame P2 benefits for businesses-more along the lines of inviting industry leaders like Batdorf and Bronson and Nike
  • Maybe invite a representative from a large consulting firm like Accenture, who make big money by selling and teaching business improvement processes that include some parts of P2 in them
  • Connection with economic development-explore specifically to understand what's happening to our exports to other countries-how is this product waste being managed?
  • Greening supply chains-GEMI representative
  • Finding credible measurements on environmental health, linking pollutants in our environment to health
  • Who else to network with?

  • Public health issues-align with labor unions and other organizations working on issues surrounding protection of worker health
  • Battelle PNNL-green chemistry-invite Scott Butner
  • Children's health-major motivator in getting people interested about environmental issues
  • Academic community on what's coming up in technology-on cutting edge of emerging issues
  • Campus student environmental groups-Net Impact at the University of Washington, used to be Students for Responsible Business-get more students involved
  • UW School of Engineering-design for Environment, get perspective on actual process
  • NBIS
  • Emerging network on sustainable investment in the Northwest

  • Funders/Fundees Reality-Check

  • Al Dietemann, Seattle Public Utilities
  • Carolyn Gangmark, U.S. EPA Region 10
  • Linda Park, Seattle Biotech Legacy Foundation
  • Tony Skapinsky, Cascadia Revolving Fund
  • Amy Solomon, Bullitt Foundation
  • Chris Wiley, PPRC
  • Share ideas, reality-checks, and logical next steps/next projects to support in the region.

    Introduction by Chris Wiley of PPRC:
    Chris discussed PPRC grant resources: Request For Proposal Clearinghouse, and National Database

    Amy Solomon, Bullitt Foundation
    The mission of The Bullitt Foundation is to protect, restore, and maintain the natural physical environment of the Pacific Northwest for present and future generations. The Foundation invites proposals from nonprofit organizations that serve Washington, Oregon, Idaho, British Columbia, western Montana (including the Rocky Mountain range), and coastal Alaska from Cook Inlet to the Canadian border. Proposals are reviewed two times a year and must be received by May 1 and November 1. They do not use a Letter of Inquiry pre-screening process. Program priorities include: Aquatic Ecosystems, Terrestrial Ecosystems, Conservation and Stewardship in Agriculture, Energy and Climate Change, Growth Management and Transportation, Toxic and Radioactive Substances, and Training, Communications, and Unique Opportunities. Past fundees include the Environmental Coalition of South Seattle, Resource Media, Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility and several public interest groups working on Hanford issues.

    Linda Park, Seattle Biotech Legacy Foundation
    The Seattle Biotech Legacy Foundation was started by a group of Immunex employees in 2002 to create a lasting legacy benefiting the Seattle community and greater Puget Sound region. The Foundation endeavors to build on the spirit of Immunex alumni, in partnership with the broader Seattle Biotech community, to address issues in the region that would benefit from their interdisciplinary expertise in science, medicine and business. Its charitable grants will primarily be directed to:

  • Human health, health of the planet and the environment, and the connection between the two
  • Science and environmental education

  • The most recent projects include a lecture series titled Our Health, Our Environment: Making the Link, intended to bring together a diverse cross section of professionals and the public, including teachers, parents, scientists, environmental advocates, and health professionals to deepen the understanding of emerging links between environmental challenges that affect our region and our health. The Grant Committee also awarded a monetary grant of $35,000 in 2003 to a joint project of Northwest Environment Watch (NEW) and Washington Toxics Coalition (WTC). Their study measures several of the more worrisome toxic chemicals, known as persistent bioaccumulative toxins (PBTs) in human breast milk as a proxy for ambient pollution in the environment.

    Carolyn Gangmark, EPA Region 10
    EPA Region 10 will be soliciting pre-applications for the Regional competition for the Source Reduction Assistance program on March 26, 2004. Applicants must be from Alaska, Idaho, Oregon or Washington, the four state geographic area covered by EPA Region 10. The RFP will be open for 60 days. A second pot of money will go to P2RX, while another pot of money is a discretionary pot that could go into either a contract, grant or purchase order. They have lots of flexibility with this pot, it is worth $100,000 and goes to facilitating meetings like the P2 Regional Roundtable. There will be 2 rounds for that, with the 1st RFP open now, and a second RFP will be due on June 11, 2004.

    Al Dietemann, Seattle Public Utilities
    Seattle Public Utilities offers commercial customers technical assistance and financial incentives to install water conservation technologies. They pay up to 50% of installed projects for commercial, institutional, and government facilities. They are financial incentives to change equipment, modify processes and modernize water usage equipment. They love projects that go to zero discharge and like to look at projects that are nontraditional. They spend about $1 million per year and only pay when project is completed and commissioned so this program is reimbursement and not really a grant. They don't pay for studies or research but for the actual implementations of energy efficient technologies. Any commercial water customer they serve is eligible. SPU serves most of King County and most of Eastside as well. There is no application process except to call SPU, pretty rare when a business can't save at least 10%, but businesses like paybacks within 2-year timeframe. One exciting project is work with drycleaners-have been seeing new technologies for water-based dry cleaning eliminating much of toxics, use a little more water.

    Tony Skapinsky, Cascadia Revolving Fund
    Cascadia Revolving Fund is a 501c3 nonprofit lender, but not a bank. It is a community-building organization started 20 years ago by a local group of philanthropists that wanted to make capital available to marginalized communities. In the last 5 years, Cascadia has become much more institutionalized, with their sources of funding growing exponentially. Federal money allows Cascadia to better reach communities and they continue to work with higher-risk, non-bankable customer base. They provide financing and business technical assistance to mainstream and stabilize business. However, they have done very limited work on environmental projects because not a lot of businesses they work with have the luxury to be forward-thinking. Their average loan is over $100,000 with the median loan under $30,000. They are focused primarily on community impact and jobs.

    Panel Discussion:
    Panel was asked where they felt there was a gap in their work. Panel participants discussed opportunities to bridge gap between federal and non-profit funders. Carolyn Gangmark replied that non-profit funders are getting feedback from community and are more in touch with socio-political pulse of the region, and that it would be interesting to work more cooperatively on funding priorities. Linda Park talked about the lack of funding for academic research. It's not that non-profits aren't already collecting data, but this information is not analyzed and therefore not connected in a way that could get information out to be used broadly. Amy Solomon discussed the need for capacity-building and training of non-profit boards to be more financially astute in oversight.

    Attendees & Speakers List

     

     

     

     

     

    speaker names are shaded yellow and italiized

     

     

     

     

     

    attendee names are shaded green

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Jonell

    Allamano

    U.S. EPA Region 10

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Shirli

    Axelrod

    Seattle Public Utilities

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Stephanie

    Bailey

    U.S. EPA Region 10

    Port Orchard

    WA

    360-871-8739

    Cynthia

    Balogh

    Local HW Mgmt. Program in King County

    Seattle

    WA

    206-263-3075

    Archie

    Beaton

    Chlorine Free Products Assn

    Algonquin

    IL

    847-658-6104

    Phil

    Berry

    Nike Corporation

    Beaverton

    OR

     

    Patti

    Best

    Idaho Dept. of Environmental Quality

    Boise

    ID

    208-373-0146

    Nik

    Blosser

    Celilo Media Group

    Portland

    OR

     

    Kristin

    Bonner

    Metafore

    Portland

    OR

    503-224-2205

    Dennis

    Bowhay

    Washington Dept. of Ecology

    Olympia

    WA

     

    Jan

    Brower

    Kitsap County Health District

    Poulsbo

    WA

    360-337-5604

    Clayton

    Brown

    Clean Water Services

    Hillsboro

    OR

    503-681-5129

    Cathy

    Buller

    PPRC

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Josh

    Chaitin

    Local HW Mgmt. Program in King County

    Seattle

    WA

    206-263-3076

    Alice

    Chapman

    Local HW Mgmt. Program in King County

    Seattle

    WA

    206-263-3058

    Neil

    Collie

    Sustainable Products Purchasers Coalition

    Portland

    OR

    503-233-8020

    Eva

    Crim

    Kitsap County Health District

    Poulsbo

    WA

    360-337-5604

    Leatta

    Dahlhoff

    Washington Dept.of Ecology

    Bellevue

    WA

    425-649-7281

    Ron

    Dalberg

    Swedish Medical Center

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Daylin

    Davidson

    Washington Dept.of Ecology

    Bellevue

    WA

    425-649-7137

    Al

    Dietemann

    Seattle Public Utilities

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Robert

    Drake

    U.S. EPA Region 10

    Seattle

    WA

    206-553-4803

    Sarah

    Earl

    Artemis Onsite

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Kathy

    Fendt

    Port of Seattle

    SeaTac

    WA

    206-988-5527

    Michelle

    Gaither

    PPRC

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Carolyn

    Gangmark

    U.S. EPA Region 10

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Signe

    Gilson

    Consultant

    Seattle

    WA

    206-632-3882

    Eun-Sook

    Goidel

    PPRC

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Ken

    Grimm

    PPRC

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Christine

    Guiao

    PPRC

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Lena

    Hakim

    Washington State University

    Richland

    WA

    509-460-1620

    Burton

    Hamner

    Pacific NW Economic Region

    Seattle

    WA

    206-526-5308

    Noriko

    Hasumi

    University of Washington

    Seattle

    WA

    n/a

    Lynn

    Helbrecht

    Washington Governor’s Executive Policy Office

    Olympia

    WA

     

    Brett

    Hulstrom

    City of Portland Env'l Specialist

    Portland

    OR

    503-823-7807

    Marney

    Jett

    Clean Water Services

    Hillsboro

    OR

    503-681-5124

    Judy

    Kennedy

    Washington Dept.of Ecology

    Olympia

    WA

    360-407-6385

    Craig

    Lorch

    Total Reclaim

    Seattle

    WA

    206-343-7443

    Amity

    Lumper

    Cascadia Consulting Group

    Seattle

    WA

    206-343-9759

    Lois

    Maffeo

    Batdorf & Bronson Coffee Roasters

    Olympia

    WA

     

    Marc

    McReynolds

    Emerald Services Inc.

    Seattle

    WA

    206-832-3031

    Alice

    Meyers

    City of Portland Env'l Technician

    Portland

    OR

    503-823-7554

    Peggy

    Morgan

    Washington Dept.of Ecology

    Olympia

    WA

    360-407-6739

    Eric

    Nelson

    King County

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Hugh

    O'Neill

    Washington Dept.of Ecology

    Olympia

    WA

     

    Linda

    Park

    Seattle Biotech Legacy Foundation

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Servando

    Patlan

    WA Department of General Administration, Office of State Procurement

    Olympia

    WA

     

    Viccy

    Salazar

    U.S. EPA Region 10

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Tony

    Skapinsky

    Cascadia Revoloving Fund

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Doug

    Smith

    U.S. EPA Region 10

    Seattle

    WA

    206-553-1200

    Amy

    Solomon

    Bullitt Foundation

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Jennifer

    Sprechler

    Washington State Quality Award

    Keyport

    WA

     

    David

    Stitzhal

    NW Product Stewardship Council

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Lori

    Stole

    Recycling Advocates

    Portland

    OR

    503-591-1454

    Crispin

    Stutzman

    PPRC

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Sally

    Tarowsky

    Idaho Small Business Development Ctr

    Boise

    ID

    208-426-1839

    Steve

    Thompson

    Clean Water Services

    Hillsboro

    OR

    503-681-5128

    John

    Vicklund

    Washington Manufacturing Service

    Mukilteo

    WA

     

    Walter

    Voegtlin

    Puget Sound Clean Air Agency

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Brian

    Westra

    Local HW Mgmt. Program in King County

    Seattle

    WA

    206-263-3051

    Eric

    Wicks

    Beaverton Schools

    Beaverton

    OR

    503-591-4461

    Chris

    Wiley

    PPRC

    Seattle

    WA

     

    Lisa

    Woodings

    U.S. Dept. of Vet. Affairs / Puget Sound Health Care System

    Seattle

    WA

    206-768-5344