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Ship Building & Repair: Background and Overview
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Background and Overview
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Profile of the Shipbuilding and Repair Industry
Provides information on industrial processes used at shipyards, their pollution outputs, pollution p...


Shipbuilding and repair facilities are unique in the fact that they exist at the meeting of air, land and water. Consequently, all environmental media can potentially be impacted by shipbuilding and repair processes.

There are over 400 commercial shipbuilding and repair facilities throughout the United States. The commercial industry works in niche markets building and repairing mid-sized vessels of more than 65 feet in length, including ferries, research and patrol boats, small to mid-size container ships, tugboats, fishing boats and luxury yachts. Military facilities are capable of repairing and overhauling naval vessels of all sizes, including submarines.

Shipbuilding, repair and maintenance activities commonly carried out at shipyards include hull cleaning, repair and painting; electrical and machine work; carpentry; steel fabrication; pipe-fitting; and sand blasting of parts. While smaller vessels can be worked on beneath shop roofs, larger vessels must be worked on outdoors in dry docks or hoisted out of the water on marine railways. In both cases, hulls are typically cleaned and stripped with high and low pressure water guns and/or dry, abrasive grit blasting. Painting of ship hulls is done mainly with spray guns.


 

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Hub Last Updated: 11/6/2012